Links from the Week's Thread

From  The Barnes Foundation  commentary on ‘Bathers at Rest’ by Paul Cezanne: “How they could make any sense of this in 1877, I can’t imagine. It must be like it fell from the sky. . . . Critics reacted to the strange anatomies of the figures . . . . The most interesting moment is that bright green triangle on the grass. Instead of representing light as it looks to the eye, he’s developing his own idiosyncratic vocabulary for representing nature.”

From The Barnes Foundation commentary on ‘Bathers at Rest’ by Paul Cezanne: “How they could make any sense of this in 1877, I can’t imagine. It must be like it fell from the sky. . . . Critics reacted to the strange anatomies of the figures . . . . The most interesting moment is that bright green triangle on the grass. Instead of representing light as it looks to the eye, he’s developing his own idiosyncratic vocabulary for representing nature.”

Saskatoon is a bastion for female politicians, with women holding 6 out of 11 city council votes. In comparison, in Edmonton the ratio is 1 of 12, Calgary 2 of 15, Victoria 5 of 9 (gets bonus visibility points for Mayor Lisa Helps), Ottawa 3 of 24, and St. John’s 1 of 11. In case you forgot, in the 2015 federal election a record number of women (88) won seats, amounting to 26% of Parliament. #womancard

So much happening in this interview with Mitski that even if you have no idea who she is, you’ll still find something in the conversation

Emily Bell’s essay in the recent Columbia Journalism Review is an entry point for further conversations on the role of tech in delivering news.

Way back in May we read ‘Why You Will Marry the Wrong Person’ and it almost featured in a best man speech. It’s the most read NYTimes article of 2016. “Rather than some notional idea of perfect complementarity, it is the capacity to tolerate differences with generosity that is the true marker of the “not overly wrong” person.”

Listening to year end musical reviews and was delighted by this story I missed back in April, which combines several of my favourite things: How ‘Maps’ became ‘Hold Up’ via Vampire Weekend and Diplo. For similar stories of the weird ways songs come together, you might like the (now classic) podcast Song Exploder.

The New York Times has published an incredible collection of photos from 2016. Take a peek.

If you enjoy people watching, check out this documentary by film maker Kirsten Johnson. She scrapbooks together clips from her work over several decades, featuring pieces from her mom’s life to life after war in Bosnia. It’s beautifully done. She teaches the patient art of observation, bearing witness, and showing meaningful human interaction with the things she is ‘documenting.’

Amy Sanderson28/12/16